Corn Facts

About Corn

Corn In The USA

The corn belt in Europe is the 4th largest in the world, and is the largest single source of Non-GMO corn agriculture. Sam Mills corn is grown with the European corn belt in Romania and is Non-GMO and Gluten-Free. By contrast nearly all - 88% - of the corn grown in the US is genetically modified.

Each American consumes 25 lbs. of corn every year. Consequently, corn is the #1 crop grown in the US and the US grows 32% of the world’s corn making it the largest producer in the world.

Rich in Antioxidants

Like other vegetables, corn can help you fight cell damaging free radicals, and may decrease your risk of heart disease, cancer and other diseases. According to Meals on Wheels West in Los Angeles, corn is a better source of antioxidants than wheat, rice or oats. The antioxidants found in corn include carotenoids, vitamin C and vitamin E.

Good for Your Eyes

Corn contains carotenoids that are especially good for your eyes: lutein and zeaxanthin. As antioxidants, lutein and zeaxanthin protect the healthy cells in your eyes against damaging high-energy blue wavelengths of light. The American Optometric Association reports lutein and zeaxanthin may help protect you from developing chronic eye diseases such as macular degeneration and cataracts, and eating foods rich in these nutrients, like corn, is recommended.


An ear of corn has about the same number of calories as an apple and less than one-fourth the sugar. In other words, it can be one of the healthier foods at the cookout!


Myth: Cooking corn makes it less nutritious.

Truth: Antioxidant activity, which helps protect the body from cancer and heart disease, is actually increased when corn is cooked.


Myth: Corn has no healthy benefits.

Truth: Sweet corn is loaded with lutein and zeaxanthin, two phytochemicals that promote healthy vision. A midsize ear also offers a helpful 3-gram dose of dietary fiber.


Nutritional Value of Corn

Corn not only provides the necessary calories for healthy, daily metabolism, but is also a rich source of vitamins A, B, E and many minerals. Its high fiber content ensures that it plays a significant role in the prevention of digestive ailments like constipation and hemorrhoids as well as colorectal cancer. The antioxidants present in corn also act as anti-carcinogenic agents and prevent Alzheimer’s disease.

Health Benefits of Corn

Corn provides many health benefits due to the presence of quality nutrients within. Besides being a delicious addition to any meal, it is also rich in phytochemicals, and it provides protection against a number of chronic diseases. Some of the well-researched and widespread health benefits of corn are listed below.

Protecting Your Heart: According to researchers, corn oil has been shown to have an anti-atherogenic effect on cholesterol levels, thus reducing the risk of various cardiovascular diseases. Corn oil, particularly, is the best way to increase heart health, and this is derived from the fact that corn is close to an optimal fatty acid combination. This allows omega-3 fatty acids to strip away the damaging “bad” cholesterol and replace them at the binding sites. This will reduce the chances of arteries becoming clogged, will reduce blood pressure, and decrease the change of heart attack and stroke.

Vitamin-A Content: Yellow corn is a rich source of beta-carotene, which forms vitamin A in the body and is essential for the maintenance of good vision and skin. Beta-carotene is a great source of vitamin-A because it is converted within the body, but only in the amounts that the body requires. Vitamin-A can be toxic if too much is consumed, so deriving vitamin-A through beta-carotene transformation is ideal. Vitamin-A will also benefit the health of skin and mucus membranes, as well as boosting the immune system.

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Myth: Corn is unhealthy.

No! Corn is a vegetable that contains nutrients, and an ear definitely counts as one of your daily servings of veggies, McDaniel says. The idea that corn is unhealthy likely came about because corn is high in starch, which is a carbohydrate. And "with the carb-phobia phase we went through over the last few years, that's probably where corn got a bad rap, along with the beloved potato," she explains.


Myth: Your body cannot digest corn -- and that's a bad thing.

While it's true that corn has high amounts of insoluble fiber -- meaning, the kind of fiber that goes through the body intact and gets those bowel movements going -- this is not a bad thing, McDaniel says. Sure, if you eat a lot of corn, you might see some of it in your stool, but insoluble fiber has been shown in research to help feed the "good" bacteria in our gut. "If we're looking at getting lots of good fiber in our diet, it's good that [corn] has a higher ratio of insoluble to soluble fiber because it feeds the good gut bacteria in our body," she explains.


Myth: Corn isn't a good source of any nutrients.

Vegetables like kale and spinach may have better reputations as nutrition all-stars, but corn has something to contribute, too. Corn contains certain B vitamins and vitamin C, as well as magnesium and potassium. Yellow corn is also a good source of two antioxidants, zeaxanthin and lutein, which are good for eye health, McDaniel says.


Myth: You shouldn't eat corn because it's really high in sugar.

You don't steer clear of bananas because you think they're high in sugar, do you? Then why should you do the same for corn? A banana contains about the same amount of calories as an ear of corn -- around 110 -- yet it has two to three times the amount of sugar. A cob of corn has around 6 to 8 grams of sugar, while a banana has about 15.